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Nudist culture, a culture that supports and embraces nudity, in our society today has been on the rise. From women and men who have body dysmorphia to people who have been fat-shamed, this body positivism culture-esque movement preaches one goal, “Love your body!” Even feminists embrace it as part of their movement and rightly so.

Nudist culture also preaches against slut-shaming in an era where slut-shamers are emboldened by the anonymity social media gives them. But like every good ideology, fanatics or rather people who don’t get the movement end up misusing it and a culture that was meant to uplift and enlighten society ends up becoming distasteful, undermining the whole idea, and making it look like a joke.

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Nudist culture dates as far back as the 20th century and was a popular movement in European countries like France and Germany. The first known use of the word naturisme (nudism is also referred to as naturism. Naturisme is French for naturism) occurred in 1778. Jean Baptiste Luc Planchon used the word to mean appreciation of nudity as a means of improving healthy living. The International Naturist Federation (Agde, France, 1974) defined naturism as

“A way of life in harmony with nature characterized by the practice of communal nudity with the intention of encouraging self-respect, respect for others and for the environment”

Wikipedia

Modern-day nudist culture, its advantages and evolution in the computer era

Modern day nudism, while still retaining the basic idea of “old day nudism” has evolved as society at large is becoming more aware. Contemporary naturists feel that social nudity should be asexual and should depend on social, cultural, geographical, and historical factors. While the asexuality of nudist culture can be argued, it is obvious that there are limits to it.

A society that has public nudity where there are minors as taboo has every right to mete out appropriate penalty should one falter. With places like the internet where nudism is accepted and where billions of pictures are viewed in seconds, the line between nudism and fanaticism can be blurred. There are simple rules to understand said line.

  • It can be termed nudism where the distributor of such content abides by the community guidelines and preaches body positivity.
  • Even if such content is sexual in nature and still abides by the guidelines it is not fanaticism, but it is also arguably not nudism.

Parents should also find ways to restrict what their under 18s or appropriate minors watch. Applications that allow parents to restrict certain content should be downloaded, and social media community where nudism is appreciated and people are free to share whatever they want to the public should have appropriate settings to give parents control when their children log on to such communities.

Feminism, a movement whose sole aim is to empower women in a patriarchal society, also preaches nudism strongly. Society has always been critical of women’s bodies expecting them to be perfect. Pictures of sexy models are often splashed all over the front covers of popular magazine brands like playboys leaving some women who think they don’t have the “perfect body” insecure. This imperfect idea of the perfect body has stuck like glue sticks to surfaces, and the struggle to get rid of this idea is one of the purposes of modern-day feminism.

While misinformed people jeer and shout “feminism” whenever they see inappropriate sexual content on the internet that is definitely not what feminism is about let alone nudism, and any abuse of nudism can be easily spotted using the simple idea that if it empowers the “subject”(the person who is nude) and preaches love of body then it is nudism. If it has nothing to do with empowerment or appreciation of the body then it is something else. Recognition of the misuse and abuse of nudism should easily be spotted by an honest, critical analysis.